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From Exhaustion to Cognitive Decline: How Mitochondrial Dysfunction Could Be Sabotaging Your Health

Updated: Feb 20, 2023



Mitochondria: The Powerhouses of Our Cells


Mitochondria are tiny organelles found in nearly all human cells, serving as the powerhouses of the cell. These small but mighty structures are responsible for producing energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is essential for cellular processes. The number of mitochondria in a cell can vary, with some cells containing only a few and others containing up to 2,400, as in the case of heart cells.


Your body uses and renews your own body weight equivalent in ATP every single day!


Mitochondria are not just responsible for producing ATP. They also play a role in various other cellular processes, including:

  • Producing heat

  • Assisting in calcium signaling

  • Inducing cell death (apoptosis) when the host cell is damaged beyond repair

  • Regulating insulin in the cell

  • Synthesizing cholesterol and other steroids

  • Maintaining cellular homeostasis by interacting with other organelles, especially peroxisomes.

Mitochondrial Dysfunction:


Mitochondrial dysfunction refers to a malfunction of the mitochondria, which can occur due to a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, oxidative stress, exposure to toxins, and aging. When mitochondria are not functioning properly, they cannot produce energy effectively, leading to a variety of cellular and health problems.


Causes of Mitochondrial Dysfunction:

  • Genetic mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes that regulate mitochondrial function

  • Exposure to toxins, such as certain drugs and chemicals

  • Infections

  • Oxidative stress

  • Aging

  • Chronic diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease

Clinical Impact and Symptoms of Mitochondrial Dysfunction:


The symptoms of mitochondrial dysfunction can be wide-ranging and may include fatigue, muscle weakness, and problems with coordination. In more severe cases, it can cause conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases, liver disease, and heart disease.


Fatigue

One of the most common consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction is fatigue. When the mitochondria are not functioning properly, the body has less energy available, which can lead to feelings of fatigue and exhaustion.


Neurodegeneration

Another consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction is neurodegeneration. The brain is an energy-intensive organ, and it requires a lot of ATP to function properly. When the mitochondria in the brain are not functioning properly, it can lead to the death of neurons, which can contribute to conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.


Cardiovascular Disease

Mitochondrial dysfunction can also contribute to cardiovascular disease. The heart is one of the most energy-intensive organs in the body, and it requires a lot of ATP to function properly. When the mitochondria in the heart are not functioning properly, it can lead to a decrease in energy production, which can contribute to conditions such as heart failure and arrhythmias.


Muscle Weakness

Muscles require a lot of energy to contract, and when the mitochondria in the muscles are not functioning properly, it can lead to a decrease in energy production, which can result in muscle weakness and fatigue.


Metabolic Disorders

Mitochondrial dysfunction can also contribute to metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. This is because the mitochondria are responsible for producing energy from glucose, and when they are not functioning properly, it can lead to a buildup of glucose in the blood, which can contribute to insulin resistance and other metabolic problems.


Testing for Mitochondrial Dysfunction:


Diagnosing mitochondrial dysfunction can be challenging, but a variety of tests are available to help determine if there is an issue. These tests may include a blood test to measure levels of lactic acid and other metabolic markers, a muscle biopsy to examine the muscle tissue (Gold Standard), and a test to measure ATP levels. Mitoswab is a non-invasive cheek swab with over 82% correlation with muscle biopsy testing.


Correcting Mitochondrial Dysfunction:


Currently, there is no cure for mitochondrial dysfunction, but there are a number of strategies that can help to manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. These may include:

  • A healthy diet with Nutrient-dense foods

  • Exercise

  • Antioxidant supplements

  • Avoiding exposure to toxins

  • Treating underlying medical conditions

  • Restorative sleep

  • Reduction in stress

  • Intermittent fasting

  • PEMF

  • IV NAD

Fascinating Facts about Mitochondria:

  • Mitochondria are sometimes referred to as the "cell's batteries".

  • They are thought to have evolved from symbiotic bacteria that lived inside primitive cells over a billion years ago.

  • Each mitochondrion has its own DNA, which is separate from the DNA in the cell nucleus.

FAQs

What causes mitochondrial dysfunction?

Mitochondrial dysfunction can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, exposure to toxins, and aging.


How is mitochondrial dysfunction diagnosed?

Mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed through a variety of tests, including blood tests, muscle biopsies, and genetic testing.


Is there a cure for mitochondrial dysfunction?

Currently, there is no cure for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, there are treatments that can help manage the symptoms and slow the progression of the condition.


Can mitochondrial dysfunction be prevented?

While it is not possible to completely prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, there are steps that can be taken to minimize the risk. These include avoiding exposure to toxins, maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine, and managing chronic health conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.


What is the outlook for people with mitochondrial dysfunction?

The outlook for people with mitochondrial dysfunction varies depending on the severity of the condition and the specific symptoms that are present. In some cases, the condition may be relatively mild and easily managed, while in other cases it can be debilitating and have a significant impact on quality of life.


In conclusion, mitochondria are essential components of our cells, serving as the primary energy source. Understanding the role of mitochondria, as well as the causes and symptoms of mitochondrial dys, can help us to better manage and improve our health.



References:

  1. NINDS Mitochondrial Disorders Information Page. (2020). National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

  2. Chinnery, P. F. (2017). Mitochondrial DNA mutations in disease. Hum Mol Genet, 26(R2), R157-R163.

  3. Zhang, X., & Cederbaum, A. I. (2012). Mitochondrial dysfunction in liver diseases. World J Gastroenterol, 18(10), 1067-1075.

  4. Goldenthal MJ, Kuruvilla T, Damle S, Salganicoff L, Sheth S, Shah N, Marks H, Khurana D, Valencia I, Legido A. Non-invasive evaluation of buccal respiratory chain enzyme dysfunction in mitochondrial disease: comparison with studies in muscle biopsy. Mol Genet Metab. 2012 Mar;105(3):457-62. doi: 10.1016/j.ymgme.2011.11.193. Epub 2011 Nov 30. PMID: 22189081.

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